Bentonville High School teacher becomes a U.S. Citizen

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Sandy Boyd came to the United States from Guatemala when she was 3-years-old.

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BENTONVILLE, Ark. (KNWA) — Sandy Boyd came to the United States from Guatemala when she was three years old.

She became a permanent resident at 17 years old. Ten years later, she’s now a U.S. citizen.

“For me personally, it was that one final step into being able to say I can now vote,” Boyd said. “I can now have my voice heard.”

For four years, Sandy Boyd has taught English classes at Bentonville High School but now she’s using her story to teach her students to use their voice outside of the classroom.

It’s been a nearly 7-month-long process for Boyd which included filling out tons of paperwork, $1,000 application fee and a lot of hard work. “You have to go in and do an interview where you are tested on your English speaking and writing ability which is funny because I teach English,” Boyd said.

At the end of the September, Boyd got the official date for her oath swearing ceremony – an opportunity she’s waited years for. “What better way to showcase this freedom that we have to make our voice heard – to show my students this does matter, your voice does count,” Boyd said.

She says she wants people, especially her students, to exercise their right to vote – a right she says many of us take for granted.

“All of the information that you’re receiving you can use that to make informed decisions and make sure that you are using the ability to vote and the ability to share that information freely in the best way possible,” Boyd said.

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Aaron Nolan is a morning show co-host in Little Rock, Arkansas with Nexstar Media Group's KARK-TV. He has a passion for social media and makes it an important part of his daily routine. Click here to read Aaron's full bio.